Dating a banker anonymous blog

Laney Crowell, one of the women who started the blog, said in the article that it was "very tongue in cheek;" she has since described it as a satire that embellishes true experiences for effect.

Had the nature of the blog been made clear at the outset, the article would have described it accordingly, not as a support group.

I have run the whole thing below (scroll down): Read it all — this is not a post you can skim.

Citing a “well-placed source” in the New York Police Department, Blackwater USA founder and retired Navy SEAL Erik Prince claims that among the 650,000 Huma Abedin emails on her estranged husband’s laptop is evidence Hillary Clinton, as well as former President Bill Clinton, was a visitor to convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein’s Caribbean hideaway, known as “Orgy Island.” he took at least 26 trips and apparently even ditched his Secret Service detail for at least five of the flights.

Crowell was recently canned by her employer, the online fashion channel Style Caster, because DABA had become too much of a distraction. "It's a character," says agent Rebecca Gradinger, "but it's a little bit of them as well." Just not as much as everyone thought.

1, a 28-year-old private wealth manager, stopped playing golf, once his passion.

More likely, the article would not have been written.

Even more explicit was the explanation Newsweek's Tony Dokopuil got from site cofounder Laney Crowell, whosays that what the Times described as a "support group" of about 30 women is actually a full-blown parody - and it's at least partly fictionalized.

But hold on a minute—are the DABA girls even for real? DABA cofounder Laney Crowell tells NEWSWEEK that what The New York Times and many other outlets portrayed as a serious Web site is, in fact, a full-blown parody by Crowell and her sidekick Megan Petrus, a Manhattan lawyer. Often the DABA girls invent fresh details for maximum satirical effect."That isn't my life," says Crowell, 27, from a coffee shop near her apartment in New York's West Village.

Dressed modestly in jeans and a pullover, Crowell describes her DABA identity as an online "character" and admits that she doesn't actually know anyone with a boyfriend-backed credit card or a slashed department-store allowance.