Carbon dating on live things

In the following article, some of the most common misunderstandings regarding radiocarbon dating are addressed, and corrective, up-to-date scientific creationist thought is provided where appropriate. Radiocarbon is used to date the age of rocks, which enables scientists to date the age of the earth.Radiocarbon is not used to date the age of rocks or to determine the age of the earth.Other radiometric dating methods such as potassium-argon or rubidium-strontium are used for such purposes by those who believe that the earth is billions of years old.Radiocarbon is not suitable for this purpose because it is only applicable: a) on a time scale of thousands of years and b) to remains of once-living organisms (with minor exceptions, from which rocks are excluded).With the notable exception of the undead, when things die they stop eating or otherwise absorbing carbon.

Before we get into the details of how radiometric dating methods are used, we need to review some preliminary concepts from chemistry.Chemically speaking, those 6 protons are far more important since they are what makes carbon act like carbon (and not oxygen or some other element).The extra pair of neutrons do two things: they make C atom it has a 50% chance of decaying in the next 5730 years (regardless of how old it presently is).Recall that atoms are the basic building blocks of matter.Atoms are made up of much smaller particles called protons, neutrons, and electrons.