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Because of the term's historical use in contexts that typically implied disapproval, more unambiguously neutral terms such as interracial, interethnic, or cross-cultural are more common in contemporary usage.The term miscegenation has been used since the 19th century to refer to interracial marriage and interracial sexual relations, In the present day, the word miscegenation is avoided by many scholars, because the term suggests a concrete biological phenomenon, rather than a categorization imposed on certain relationships.For instance, John Piper contends that “interracial marriage is not only permitted by God but is a positive good in our day.” Similarly, secular humanist Paul Kurtz gives a more comprehensive and forthright affirmation of miscegenation when he states, “The highest good, as I see it, is intermarriage between people of different ethnicities, races, religions, and cultures.” Against views like these, it is rare to hear an opposing opinion today, and this is usually because any opposition to miscegenation — even saying merely that it is not a good idea — receives accusations of racism or, if the voice of opposition is a white person, white supremacy.Opposition to interracial marriage, especially if coming from a white person, is usually interpreted to entail hatred of other races.The fact that he separated the races shows that he did not intend for the races to mix.”After the Supreme Court invalidated bans on interracial marriage, Bob Jones University still argued that the freedom of religion provisions of the First Amendment allowed it to ban interracial dating and keep its tax-exempt status while doing so, because its “rule against interracial dating is a matter of religious belief and practice.” And after the Supreme Court rejected this argument, in 1983, the university continued to ban interracial dating until the year 2000.Even the more subtle legal defenses of same-sex marriage bans mirror the arguments used to defend bans on interracial marriage.Proponents of these marriage bans framed their arguments in religious terms; legislators even quoted scripture and proclaimed that the ban was necessary “for the stability of society and for the greater glory of God.”The states’ lawyers defending these marriage bans have wisely refrained from invoking religion in their briefs to the high court, but they hint at it all the same; one state argues that the so-called “traditional definition” of marriage “goes back thousands of years.” And many of the third-party groups supporting the marriage bans have been even more explicit in arguing that their own religious beliefs justify their opposition to other people's marriages.Some examples:* The Michigan Catholic Conference tells the court that “[t]he basis of our government is religion.” The brief repeatedly cites the Book of Genesis and argues that “God’s joinder of man and woman in marriage, exemplary as it is, inspired the secular law governing marriage.”* The brief of a coalition called “Religious Organizations, Public Speakers, and Scholars Concerned About Free Speech,” states that “[f]or two millenia, Christians have based their definition of marriage on the words of Jesus Christ.”* The Foundation For Moral Law, a group founded by Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, advises that “[t]he Bible, which has influenced moral values for Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and other religions, contains clear disapproval of homosexual conduct in the Old Testament (Leviticus ) and in the New Testament (Romans –27).”* A group of self-proclaimed “Major Religious Organizations” warns that the Supreme Court cannot recognize marriage equality “without inflicting grave harm on millions of religious believers and their cherished beliefs and institutions.”This is not the first time that religion has been invoked to justify marriage discrimination.

In Portuguese-speaking Latin America (i.e., Brazil), a milder form of caste system existed, although it also provided for legal and social discrimination among individuals belonging to different races, since slavery for blacks existed until the late 19th century.When two cultures are introduced into the same area, more often than not, cultures collide, inevitably comprising certain aspects of both cultures.Because so much of culture is fastened to race; when culture is compromised, often is race, resulting in the decline of true diversity.Allegedly, the only reason people would be opposed to marrying those of other races is because they have hatred or animosity for other races.It is because of this allegation that any opposition to miscegenation has been thoroughly and censoriously silenced.