Accomodating lens

Ever since their conception, multifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) have been measured against their predecessor, monofocal lenses.With the appearance of accommodating lenses on the market in recent years, inevitable comparisons are now being drawn between multifocal lenses and the latest advancement in IOL technology.With the latest advances, having clear vision at only one distance is no longer the only option.

Your physician will discuss with you the appropriateness of these based on your individual visual needs and on your eye examination. Accommodating IOLs are also designed to provide a continuous range of vision for distance, intermediate, and near, eliminating or reducing patients’ dependence on reading glasses or bifocals.This process can occur in as little as 350 milliseconds. By the fifth decade of life the accommodative amplitude can decline so that the near point of the eye is more remote than the reading distance. Once presbyopia occurs, those who are emmetropic (do not require optical correction for distance vision) will need an optical aid for near vision; those who are myopic (nearsighted and require an optical correction for distance vision), will find that they see better at near without their distance correction; and those who are hyperopic (farsighted) will find that they may need a correction for both distance and near vision.Note that these effects are most noticeable when the pupil is large; i.e. The age-related decline in accommodation occurs almost universally to less than 2 dioptres by the time a person reaches 45 to 50 years, by which time most of the population will have noticed a decrease in their ability to focus on close objects and hence require glasses for reading or bifocal lenses.“Typically who I use the multifocal Re STOR for patients who are most motivated to eliminate their need for reading glasses and who don’t do a lot of night driving.The other thing I like about it is they’re not pupil dependent and slight decentrations don’t seem to affect the performance of the lens,” Dr. “Since I’ve been starting to use the Aspheric lens I’m actually finding that I’m starting to get better night vision than I had with the standard Re STOR.” There are however, some patients who complain a little bit about their intermediate vision, that is, their reading point is a little too close, he said. Horn, on the other hand, who often implants the Re STOR Aspheric bilaterally, said that he started noticing that the Re STOR might actually be good enough for some of those patients needing intermediate vision.